Categories ArchivesFestivals

The Fire Dragon Dance: Tai Hang’s Mid-Autumn Spectacle 2018

Aside from being Hong Kong’s cradle for countless culinary ventures, Tai Hang is also home to one of the city’s most spectacular festivities– the annual Tai Hang Fire Dragon Dance. This Mid-Autumn Festival, treat yourself to a dazzling display of fire and fury, where around 300 people parade a 67-meter-long dragon lined with sticks of incense from head to tail, enshrouding the neighborhood in a warm, smoky glow. How the fire dragon dance began Legend has it that this 138-year-old tradition began when Tai Hang was struck with three consecutive disasters a few days before the Mid-Autumn Festival in the 19th century. Still a small Hakka village at the time, Tai Hang was hit by a typhoon, which swept away ...

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Learn how to make moon cakes

Learn how to make moon cakes with Hong Kong Foodie! Let us bring you into the kitchen of a 52-year-old Chinese bakery in Sham Shui Po. The pastry chefs here are ramping up the production of moon cakes for the upcoming Mid-Autumn Festival. If you are visiting in September, be sure to join us on our Sham Shui Po Foodie Tour for our annual moon cake tasting starting this Friday, September 7th. You might even have a chance to experience the behind-the-scenes of moon cake making at this legendary Chinese bakery on our Foodie Tour! Here’s a sneak peek of what they do in their kitchen: Prepare the moon cake crust In this traditional Chinese bakery, the moon cake production ...

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Cheung Chau Bun Festival 2018

Happy Birthday to the Buddha! Not only do we celebrate Buddha’s birthday today, this week is also the time for the annual Cheung Chau Bun Festival! History & Background of Cheung Chau Bun Festival The Cheung Chau Bun Festival dates back to Qing Dynasty, more than a century ago. At that time, Cheung Chau was badly affected by a big plague. Hoping to drive evil spirits away, villagers prayed to the gods and performed a parade along the island’s narrow streets, holding the statues of the deities. Miraculously, the plague ended shortly after the parade. Since then, Cheung Chau residents have come together as a strong community to celebrate the Bun Festival every year from the firth to the ninth ...

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Top Things to Do In Hong Kong During Chinese New Year 2018

Chinese New Year is a very special time of year and if you are looking for things to do in Hong Kong during Chinese New Year, there are plenty of ways to mark the occasion.  Our Foodie Tours are closed for the holidays, resuming on February 26th, but if you are stuck for ideas, here are our suggestions for top things to do during Chinese New Year. 1. Eat many fabulous dishes with names sounding like good fortune Superstition and tradition are closely connected – even with the food that is consumed for Chinese New Year. Many of the foods that people eat during the holiday are not only delicious, they also have symbolic meaning. Some believe that they are ...

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Five Favorite Chinese New Year Pudding

Chinese New Year is only two days away and many of us Foodies have already hand made or stocked up on our Chinese New Year Pudding. Along with the tradition of wearing new clothes to symbolize a new start and fresh hopes for the coming year, we also look forward to eating some yummy traditional Chinese New Year food. Several of the favorite Chinese New Year dishes are puddings or cakes of some kind, since the Cantonese word for “cake” has a similar pronunciation as the word “high” and is symbolic of prosperity and “rising” fortunes. Most westerners anticipate sweet and sticky confections when they hear the word cake or pudding, so it will come as a bit of a ...

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Spring Lantern Festival

Chinese Lantern Festival celebrates the first full moon of the lunar new year. It's also known as Chinese Valentine's Day. See how and where we celebrate this Yuan Xiao festival in Hong Kong.

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8 Things to Do in Hong Kong During Chinese New Year 2016

Are you wondering things to do in Hong Kong during Chinese New Year in 2016? February 8th marks the first day of the Year of the Monkey. If you are planning to visit Hong Kong before or during Chinese New Year, unfortunately, our Foodie Tours will be closed during this time, but there are still plenty of activities to do in Hong Kong to celebrate this festive occasion! 1. Eat Lots of Good Food! Do we need to say more? All Chinese festivals centers around their traditional foods. For sure, Chinese New Year is associated with the most food you can think of among all festivals! It ranges from savory and sweet puddings such as turnip cakes, deep-fried goodies like sesame balls to ...

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Reunion Dinner to Wrap Up the Year of the Horse

The Year of the Horse has quickly flown by. As we wrap up another fruitful year, we take time to celebrate with our families. On Chinese New Year’s Eve, it is our tradition to gather together with our family members to feast on a big Reunion Dinner or Tuen Neen Fan (團年飯). This year, our menu included items not typically served as a Chinese Year-End dinner. Hong Kong Foodie thought we would share with our Foodie Friends our sumptuous dinner in order to make you salivate! To start, we tasted some vegetarian “goose” as appetizer (see photo above).  A great vegetarian option, mushroom and other veggie fillings are wrapped with this bean curd sheet and fried. Dip this in some ...

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Brief Guide to Lion Dance & Dragon Dance

There are a lot of different celebrations for Chinese New Year. On the streets of Hong Kong during Chinese New Year, you may have seen lions and dragons dancing to clanging gongs and beating drums as part of the new year celebrations. So what is this lion dance and dragon dance all about? What is the difference between the two? A lion dance (舞狮) is believed to bring good fortune. Many businesses arrange a team of lion dancers for a performance at the beginning of the new year hoping for a prosperous year ahead.  Lions are also believed to be able to chase away evil spirits and protect the community. There are two types of lion dances. Northern lion dance, common ...

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Traditional Chinese New Year Dish: Black Moss with Dried Oysters

What else do we have as Chinese New Year Dish? Black Moss? Hair Vegetable? Get Rich? As mentioned in our previous blog post, homonyms are prevalent in Cantonese, especially with Chinese New Year festive greetings and with names of food served during this time of the year. This evening, we had one such dish — 發財好事 — literally translates as Be Prosperous, Great Things. Or more generally, it means great fortune. The dish features two main ingredients. One is 髮菜, literally translated as “hair vegetable” is black moss, but it is phonetically pronounced like 發財 (Be Prosperous). Another ingredient is 蠔豉, or dried oysters, which sounds like 好事, or great things. It is believed that having this dish will bring lots ...

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