Categories ArchivesFestivals

What is the Double Ninth Festival or the Chung Yeung Festival?

What is the Double Ninth Festival (重陽節)? Also called the Chung Yeung Festival and Chongyang Festival, the Double Ninth Festival is an ancient memorial festival that falls on the ninth day of the ninth month of the lunar calendar. In 2020, the Double Ninth Festival falls on the 25th October in the Greogorian calendar. On this day, families visit the graves of their ancestors to pay their respects. People also go hiking together as heading to higher ground symbolizes climbing to a higher position in life and living longer. Chrysanthemums are also ubiquitous on the Double Ninth Festival, as the Festival takes place when the flowers are in full bloom. Drinking chrysanthemum wine and admiring chrysanthemums have thus become part ...

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What is the Mid Autumn Festival? Here’s the story.

by Rachel Au An interesting sight appears every August in Hong Kong. Mooncake advertisements begin to line wall after wall at any given MTR train station, starring celebrities ranging from veteran comedian Eric Tsang to Japanese actress Alice Hirose. Such is the result of aggressive marketing campaigns by various Hong Kong bakeries, hoping to capture maximum market share during the sliver of time mooncakes are consumed – the Mid Autumn Festival. But what is the Mid Autumn Festival? Why do Chinese communities across the globe celebrate it with such enthusiasm? Here, we explore what the festival is and the legends behind it, each a story that has been passed down for generations. What is the Mid Autumn Festival? The Mid ...

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The Fire Dragon Dance: Tai Hang’s Mid-Autumn Spectacle

by Rachel Au Aside from being Hong Kong’s cradle for countless culinary ventures, Tai Hang is also home to one of the city’s most spectacular festivities– the annual Tai Hang Fire Dragon Dance. This Mid-Autumn Festival, treat yourself to a dazzling display of fire and fury, where around 300 people parade a 67-meter-long dragon lined with sticks of incense from head to tail, enshrouding the neighborhood in a warm, smoky glow. How the fire dragon dance began Legend has it that this 138-year-old tradition began when Tai Hang was struck with three consecutive disasters a few days before the Mid-Autumn Festival in the 19th century. Still a small Hakka village at the time, Tai Hang was hit by a typhoon, ...

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Five Favorite Chinese New Year Pudding

Chinese New Year is only five days away and many of us Foodies have already hand made or stocked up on our Chinese New Year Pudding. Along with the tradition of wearing new clothes to symbolize a new start and fresh hopes for the coming year, we also look forward to eating some yummy traditional Chinese New Year food. Several of the favorite Chinese New Year dishes are puddings or cakes of some kind, since the Cantonese word for “cake” has a similar pronunciation as the word “high” and is symbolic of prosperity and “rising” fortunes. Most westerners anticipate sweet and sticky confections when they hear the word cake or pudding, so it will come as a bit of a ...

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Chinese New Year Greetings in Cantonese: 10 Essential Ones to Know

by Rachel Au Chinese New Year falls relatively early in 2020, on 25 January. With the biggest holiday in Chinese culture just around the corner, it’s time to equip yourself with some Chinese New Year greetings to impress your friends and family! Here is our selection of the ten essential greetings you need to know. Learn to say these Chinese New Year greetings in Cantonese with the pronunciations provided! 1. 恭喜發財 Gong Hei Faat Choy 2. 新年快樂 Sun Nin Fai Lok Pronunciation: sun nin fai lok Meaning: Happy new year More about it: “sun nin fai lok” can be said to anyone, at any time during Chinese New Year. An extremely versatile Chinese New Year greeting, it can be said ...

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Nine Things to Do In Hong Kong During Chinese New Year 2020

The Year of the RAT will be upon us soon! Chinese New Year is a very special time of year and if you are looking for things to do in Hong Kong during Chinese New Year, there are plenty of ways to mark the occasion. Many of the family-run eateries are closed for the holidays to celebrate the new year and also to take a much-needed rest. As such, our Foodie Tours will also be closed, resuming on February 1st, 2020. Do not despair, however, if you will be visiting Hong Kong during this time of the year. There are lots of activities for you to experience Hong Kong and our culture with us during this fun time of the year. ...

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Learn how to make moon cakes

Learn how to make moon cakes with Hong Kong Foodie! Let us bring you into the kitchen of a 53-year-old Chinese bakery in Sham Shui Po. The pastry chefs here are ramping up the production of moon cakes for the upcoming Mid-Autumn Festival. If you are visiting in September, be sure to join us on our Sham Shui Po Foodie Tour for our annual moon cake tasting. You might even have a chance to experience the behind-the-scenes of moon cake making at this legendary Chinese bakery on our Foodie Tour! Here’s a sneak peek of what they do in their kitchen: Prepare the moon cake crust In this traditional Chinese bakery, the moon cake production is done by four chefs. ...

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An Insider’s Perspective on Dragon Boat Racing

Dragon Boat Racing There is no sport more colorful, more exciting, more laden with culture and tradition than dragon boat racing. Imagine thumping drums, deafening chants, and billowing flags – these all accompany this adrenaline-packed sport at every race. Contrary to popular belief, dragon boat races aren’t only held on Tuen Ng Festival. The racing season in Hong Kong actually lasts from early April to late November, until the weather gets a little too cold for an entire day out in open water. Don’t assume that teams get to rest over the chillier months. The city’s dragon boaters take advantage of the winter months to gain the upper hand over their competitors. There’s no other way to win than continue ...

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Spring Lantern Festival

Chinese Lantern Festival celebrates the first full moon of the lunar new year. It's also known as Chinese Valentine's Day. See how and where we celebrate this Yuan Xiao festival in Hong Kong.

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Chinese New Year’s Eve Dinner (Tuen Neen Fan)

Imagine plates teeming with food and completely covering the dining table, small children running around the tiny, cramped apartment, adults huddled around the television, trying to block out the piercing voices of their sugar-high children– these are the essentials that make up a Chinese New Year’s Eve dinner. Also known as Tuen Neen Fan (團年飯) or reunion dinner, this feast is eaten the night before the first day of the Chinese New Year, and is when the entire family gathers to conclude the year together before a new beginning. The Chinese New Year’s Eve dinner plays a significant role in Chinese culture, and is one of the traditional events Chinese communities worldwide look forward to most. Besides chicken, fish, and ...

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